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Lannan Sculptures and History of the PBCC Museum of Art: Lannan Sculptures at Palm Beach State College

"The Lannan Garden" designed by Mark Hampton

 

 

 

Mark Hampton was the architect that also renovated the Lake Theatre to house the Lannan Foundation Museum in 1983. In 1988 it was donated to PBCC to become the Palm Beach Community College Museum of Art.  See article in Art & Culture - winter 2012:

History of the Sculptures in front the LLRC Building

J. Patrick Lannan accumulated over 5,000 pieces  of contemporary paintings and sculptures.  Some of them were housed in the Lannan Estate in Palm Beach and some in the Lannan Museum on Lake Avenue in Lake Worth.  At the time of his dealth Mr. Lannan was considering building a large museum on this campus [PBJC Lake Worth] to house the entire collection and future acquisitions.  The [Lannan Foundation] board decided to keep much of the sculptures in South Fla [upon Mr. Lannan's death]. The donations to PBJC [for this garden ]were four works by three artists, two Germans and one Japanese[Karl Prantl, Erich Reischke and Yasuo Mizui]. All of these works were commissioned by Mr. Lannan. The artists executed the works in Maine [maybe Vermont?].  All the marble is Maine marble.  The works were then transported to Lannan's estate in Palm Beach. The garden was designed by Mark Hampton, the Miami-based architect who redesigned the art deco movie theatre in Lake Worth which now houses the Lannan Museum [at that time].

(from PBJC Contact- December 1986)

The three artists were together at the Vermont International Sculpture Symposium , 1971 along with :Lois Ingram, Paul Aschenbach, Viktor Rogy, Herbert Baumann, Ken Campbell, Janez Lenassi, Yasuo Mizui, Minoru Niizuma, Philip Pavia, Karl Prantl, Erich Reischke, see: http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/paul-aschenbach-papers-7308

 

Could it have been as the result of this symposium that Mr. Lannan bought his sculptures?

Information on artist Karl Prantl: http://www.tanzatelierwien.at/karlprantl/_download/files/Karl%20Prantl_From%20Poettsching.pdf

                                                  http://www.danubiana.sk/eng/exh_prantl.html

Information on artist Eric Reischke: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erich_Reischke(in German)

Information on artist Yasuo Mizui : http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yasuo_Mizui(in German); Similar sculpture to the one in Lannan Garden:

http://israelpublicart.com/public_art/?art=hommage-a-la-grande-nature-du-neguev

Meilach, Dona Z. Contemporary Stone Sculpture: Aesthetics, Methods, Appreciation. 1970. - Archives NB1208.M441987. In this book all three sculpturors were mentioned with a few photographs of some of their work.

"Meditation Stones' by Karl Prantl

This Sculpture is 4'5" by 14' by 2'10" and weights 16 tons. "Meditation Stones is not yet complete.  The indentations on the top of the sculpture are for a number of marble spheres of various size.  They were simply lying in place at the Lannan Estate, but in the present setting, it would be necessary to devise a means from anchoring them firmly in place as unobstrusively as possible. " [from Contact, Dec. 1986] [It seems that the sculpture was never completed. Maybe they were not able to anchor the missing parts.]

"L'echo du Rive" by Yassur Mizui

This sculpture is 10.5 tons of pure white marble.  It is 7'8" high and 6' wide. [from Contact, Dec. 1986]

"Marble Cube" by Karl Prantl

 

 This sculpture is 6' bu 6' by 4'10'' high and it weights about 20 tons [Contact, Dec. 1986].

"WirSind Noch Keine Menschen Im Humanistichen Sinne" by Erich Reischke

 

 

 

 

 

This Composite is by Erich Reischkle and the 16 pieces have a combined weight of about 15 tons.  The title of this work is carved around the corner of one of the pieces . In German it reads WIR SIND NOCH KEINE MENSCHEN IM HUMANISTICHEN SINNE. This has been translated as "We are not yet human in the spirit of humanity" [Contact, Dec. 1986]

"Walk Through" (1986) By Bernie Kirschenbaum

This sculpture is located at the south side of the Duncan Theatre.  It was one of the sculptures donated to the college from the Lannan Collection. Notice that the sculpure looks like a different one depending on the angle that the picture was taken of the sculpture.  It is all the same sculpture!